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2018 Conference for High Impact Research has ended

The second annual Conference for High Impact Research will be held on May 14, 2018, specifically to help faculty prepare for the summer research break and will offer distinct sessions and a plenary luncheon. Share knowledge with external experts, information professionals from AU Library, and colleagues at this day-long event. Connect with your Library subject specialist and enjoy learning about furthering your impact with your peers. Sign up to attend the conference and create your custom schedule HERE!

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Monday, May 14
 

9:15am

Everything You’ve Wanted to Know about Publishing but Were Afraid to Ask
Limited Capacity filling up

In this session, books acquisitions editors from two global university presses will demystify all aspects of the publishing process, from finding a publisher to disseminating and promoting your research after publication. The panelists will share insights on a wide array of topics, including how to write an effective book proposal, how to navigate the peer review process, what to expect after signing a contract, and how to avoid common pitfalls. 

Moderators
avatar for Mary Mintz

Mary Mintz

Associate Director for Outreach, Associate Librarian, American University
Mary Mintz has been a library faculty member at AU since the early 1980s.  Her master’s paper in library science focused on enhancing vocabulary for database retrieval.  She is pleased to return to that topic in the context of the Conference on High Impact Research.  At AU s... Read More →

Speakers
AC

Angela Chnapko

Associate Editor, Politics and Law, Oxford University Press
Angela Chnapko began her career in publishing at Lingua Franca magazine, after completing a master's degree in English at New York University. She then transitioned to working on books at Routledge, and has been an editor at Oxford University Press for the past ten years. 
avatar for Deborah Gershenowitz

Deborah Gershenowitz

Senior Editor for American and Latin American History, Cambridge University Press
Deborah Gershenowitz has edited both academic and trade history materials for 20 years. Beginning at the journal the American and Trade History Review while pursuing her graduate degree in American History at Indiana University. She has since worked at Charles Scribner's Sons, Pa... Read More →



Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:30am
Training and Events, Room 150, First Floor

9:15am

Promote Yourself! Managing Your Research and Scholarly Profile
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will cover tools and strategies for:
• Managing your scholarly profile – Academia, ResearchGate, Google Scholar Profiles, ORCiD and other researcher IDs
• Avoiding predatory publishers
• Article sharing rights
• Publishing open access – DOAJ, SHERPA/ROMEO, Sparc author addendums, Open Acess Fund
• Understanding metrics and altmetrics



Moderators
avatar for Christine Dulaney

Christine Dulaney

Director of Technical Services, AU Library, American University

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Borchardt

Rachel Borchardt

Science Librarian, American University
Rachel Borchardt is the science librarian at American University. Her professional research focuses on the intersection of metrics and libraries, and she has written and presented on the topic in many venues, including a recent book publication titled Meaningful Metrics: A 21st-C... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Click

Amanda Click

Business Librarian, American University
Amanda is the business librarian at American University, supporting the research needs of the faculty and students in the Kogod School of Business. In 2016, she earned a PhD in Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she studied the cultura... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Tegen

Sarah Tegen

Vice President, Global Editorial & Author Services, American Chemical Society
Sarah Tegen, PhD, is Vice President for Global Journals Development at the American Chemical Society.  A veteran of the publishing industry, Tegen serves as  President of the Council of Science Editors, as co-Chair of the Journals Committee for the Professional and Scholarly Pu... Read More →



Monday May 14, 2018 9:15am - 10:30am
Library Screening Room, B-51, Lower Level

10:45am

Adding a Digital Dimension to your Research
Limited Capacity filling up

Examining projects undertaken at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, this session will survey digital dimensions that you can add to your research, such as digital collections and exhibits, online teaching resources, and a presence online and on social media, and discuss how the Center approaches and manages collaborations with faculty to produce digital research and scholarship.

Moderators
avatar for Melissa Becher

Melissa Becher

Associate Director, Research Teaching, Learning, American University Library
Melissa Becher is a Reference/Instruction Librarian and Associate Director of Research, Teaching, and Learning at AU Library. She provides research assistance and information literacy instruction to the AU community. She implements new web-based library services and plays a role... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Robertson

Stephen Robertson

Director, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University


Monday May 14, 2018 10:45am - 12:00pm
Training and Events, Room 150, First Floor

10:45am

Making the Most of Your Research Leave
Limited Capacity seats available

Research Leaves/Sabbaticals are precious opportunities to fully focus on your research…and they fly by with alarming speed. This session will explore ways you can prepare and plan, setting yourself up to maximize the effectiveness of your time. We will reflect on how we structured our time during our leaves and the pitfalls that we encountered.  

Moderators
avatar for Gwendolyn Reece

Gwendolyn Reece

American University
Chair WRLC Steering Committee 2012-2017, Chair WRLC Shared Collections Vision Task Force

Speakers
avatar for Nelson Amaral

Nelson Amaral

Assistant Professor, Department of Marketing, American University
Nelson Amaral is a consumer psychologist who focuses on two broad streams of research. The first is concerned with understanding how consumers process information and, particularly, the factors (e.g. distractions, order) that influence judgments and decisions. The second stream e... Read More →
avatar for Lewis Faulk

Lewis Faulk

Associate Professor, Department of Public Administration and Policy, American University
Lewis Faulk is an Associate Professor of Public Administration and Policy in the School of Public Affairs at American University. Dr. Faulk is a Fellow of the Metropolitan Policy Center at American University, Affiliated Faculty of American University’s Center for Innovation, a... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 10:45am - 12:00pm
Library Screening Room, B-51, Lower Level

10:45am

Peer Review and Research Impact: A Study of Publications in Marketing Science
Limited Capacity seats available

Citations received is an important measure of impact in academic research. An equally important metric of scholarship is publications in high impact journals where authors must navigate the peer review process. Yet, little is known about how the review process influences an article’s research impact, post-publication. Using a unique dataset of 434 articles published in a high impact journal such as Marketing Science, we develop critical insights for researchers and academic administrators.  

Moderators
avatar for Amanda Click

Amanda Click

Business Librarian, American University
Amanda is the business librarian at American University, supporting the research needs of the faculty and students in the Kogod School of Business. In 2016, she earned a PhD in Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she studied the cultura... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Nandini Lahiri

Nandini Lahiri

Associate Professor, Department of Management, American University
Nandini Lahiri is Associate Professor of Management at the Kogod School of Business at American University. Her research lies at the intersection of strategy, international business and technology. She studies the implications of geographic and vertical scope of firms in the cont... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 10:45am - 12:00pm
Graduate Research Center Classroom, B-60, Lower Level

12:00pm

Plenary Lunch: Cases in High Impact Research
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will feature two American University faculty members who have been successful in obtaining external funding to support their scholarship. These cases exemplify the high impact research that enhance the national reputation of the University. Jeff Gill, distinguished professor of government, and Mark Laubach, professor of biology, will discuss their work and their paths to achieving productive research outcomes.

Statistical Modeling to Understand Terrorism: An Overview of New Tools
Jeff Gill
Governments around the world spend an enormous about of resources attempting to understand and prevent terrorist attacks. Unfortunately these efforts continue to be only partially successful. Data that describe terrorist events is particularly difficult to analyze, due to the many problems associated with the collection process, unusual clustered variability in the data itself, and the typically poor level of measurement coming from pursuing political actors that seek to deny reliable observations on their activities. In this talk, Jeff Gill will describe some recent statistical innovations that provide revealing and important trends in terrorist activities worldwide. The examples will describe sophisticated statistical procedures in accessible and general language. Many of the conclusions are surprising and show systematic behavior by these violent and dangerous groups.

The OpenBehavior Project
Mark Laubach
An ongoing technological revolution in neuroscience, supported by the NIH BRAIN Initiative, has yielded a broad array of new tools to observe and manipulate neural circuits. In parallel, many newly developed technologies to measure and control behavior have been developed but have not been widely shared or disseminated. As such, there remains a gap between the availability of new behavioral tools and their wide deployment by the larger research community. The OpenBehavior Project is addressing this issue by providing an integrated set of activities to facilitate dissemination of resources and training materials for creating and using newly developed technologies for the study of behavior. Our goal is to dramatically lower barriers that researchers face in carrying out sophisticated behavioral neuroscience experiments and raise overall research productivity.

Moderators
avatar for Nancy Davenport

Nancy Davenport

University Librarian, American University
Nancy Davenport is the University Librarian at American University. Immediately prior she was working in Vietnam on an AID funded project to create a parliamentary library for their legislature. She has held senior positions at the Library of Congress as the Director of Acquisit... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Scott A. Bass

Scott A. Bass

Provost, American University
Scott A. Bass is the Provost at AU and Professor of Public Administration and Policy. A Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, Dr. Bass received the Donald P. Kent Award for exhibiting the highest standards for professional leadership in gerontology in teaching, service... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Gill

Jeff Gill

Distinguished Professor, Department of Government, American University
I have done extensive work in the development of Bayesian hierarchical models, elicited prior development from expert interviews,as well in fundamental issues in statistical inference. I have extensive expertise in statistical computing, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) tools in p... Read More →
avatar for Mark Laubach

Mark Laubach

Professor, Department of Biology, American University
I am a neurobiologist interested in how groups of neurons work together to process information. My research has focused on the frontal cortex and basal ganglia and their roles in executive control and decision making. My laboratory uses a systems and computational approach and co... Read More →



2:15pm

Striking Gold: How to Dazzle Funders with Your Grant Proposal
Limited Capacity filling up

All grant making organizations have their own ways of working, but almost all of them approach the grant making decision process in a relatively similar way. All foundations want to know certain pieces of information such as how does the applicant’s values align with theirs, the applicant’s track record and the impact that the proposed project will make on the community. This session will provide insight from a foundation’s perspective on how grant makers reach decisions and how applicants can position the next proposal for success.

Moderators
avatar for Nikhat Ghouse

Nikhat Ghouse

Associate Librarian for the Social Sciences, American University
Nikhat J. Ghouse is Associate Librarian for the Social Sciences in the College of Arts & Sciences and the Coordinator of the Diversity Alliance Residency Program at American University. In addition to her Master’s in Library & Information Science from the University of Pittsbur... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Alexander

Ashley Alexander

Director of Office of Sponsored Programs, American University
Ashley J. Alexander, PhD, joined OSP in July 2015 and has over ten years of sponsored research experience. As Director, Ashley is responsible for providing leadership, support and continuous process improvement for pre-award and post-award services for grants and contracts for al... Read More →
avatar for Tobi Printz-Platnick

Tobi Printz-Platnick

Associate Director , The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Tobi Printz-Platnick is an Associate Director with The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, which funds nonprofit organizations in the metropolitan DC area. Her portfolio focuses on education and workforce development. She served as the founding Co-Chair of the Early Care and... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Training and Events, Room 150, First Floor

2:15pm

The Power of Online Exhibits in High Impact Research: Omeka and Preserve the Baltimore Uprising 2015
Limited Capacity seats available

Preserve the Baltimore Uprising is a digital repository that seeks to preserve and make accessible original content that was captured and created by individual community members, grassroots organizations, and witnesses to the protests that followed the death of Freddie Gray on April 19, 2015. This digital archive, built on the Omeka platform, represents a powerful collaboration between university scholars, the Maryland Historical Society, and the public. This session will explore the capabilities of Omeka and the experience of researchers in creating this innovative and consequential project.

Moderators
avatar for Gwendolyn Reece

Gwendolyn Reece

American University
Chair WRLC Steering Committee 2012-2017, Chair WRLC Shared Collections Vision Task Force

Speakers
avatar for Megan Brett

Megan Brett

Digital History Associate at the Roy Rosenszweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
Megan R. Brett is a doctoral candidate in the department of History and Art History at George Mason University. Her scholarship examines family strategies and the formation of national identity of Americans abroad in the post-revolutionary period. Ms. Brett is the Digital History... Read More →
avatar for Denise Meringolo

Denise Meringolo

Associate Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Denise Meringolo is a scholar-practitioner in the field of public history. She teaches courses in community-based public history practice, material culture, and visual culture. Her book Museums, Monuments, and National Parks: Toward a New Genealogy of Public History (University of Massachusetts, 2012) won the 2013 National Council on Public History prize for the best book in the field. She is currently working on several projects. She is leading a collaborative study, Radical Roots: Civic Engagement, Public History, and a Tradition of Social Justice Activism, designed to broaden the accepted genealogy of public history. The project aims to identify new historical precedents for core values and practices that define the field, particularly those associated with civic engagement. The project is also designed to advance new critical perspectives on the ways in which those values and practices have been put to the task of advancing social justice, in the past and today. In addition, Dr. Meringolo established a digital collection project... Read More →
avatar for Joe Tropea

Joe Tropea

Curator of Films and Photographs and Digital Projects Coordinator, Maryland Historical Society
Joe Tropea earned a Master’s in Historical Studies with a concentration in Public History from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He is currently the Curator of Films & Photographs at the Maryland Historical Society, where he creates exhibits, writes and edits the bl... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Graduate Research Center Classroom, B-60, Lower Level

2:15pm

To Tweet or Not to Tweet? Find Your Community of Influence on Social Media for Greater Impact
Limited Capacity seats available

In a world where everyone seems to have their own megaphone, it’s important to know how to target the right audience with the right content to create engagement. Attendees will leave this session with actions they can take immediately to help them find and engage their communities of influence on social media. They will also learn which social channels are best for presenting their work, as well as best practices for each.

Moderators
avatar for Derrick Jefferson

Derrick Jefferson

Communication Librarian, AU Library, American University

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Vander Linde

Rebecca Vander Linde

Manager of Digital Communications, University Marketing and Communications, American University
Rebecca began working for American University in June 2010. In her current role as manager of digital communications, she leads the university's main social media accounts and website. She also co-chairs the Content Publishers Committee and leads the Social Media Group.
avatar for Rachel Weatherly

Rachel Weatherly

Director, Digital Communication Strategy, University Marketing, American University
A self-proclaimed math nerd who went to art school, Rachel didn't take the most direct route to her current role as Director of Digital Communications Strategy. She spent almost a decade at Gannett/USA TODAY during the tumultuous digital transformation of media. Her sense of adve... Read More →


Monday May 14, 2018 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Library Screening Room, B-51, Lower Level